Chemical elements
  Beryllium
    Isotopes
    Energy
    Production
    Application
    Physical Properties
    Chemical Properties
      Beryllium Hydride
      Beryllium Fluoride
      Beryllium Chloride
      Beryllium Bromide
      Beryllium Iodide
      Beryllium Double Halides
      Beryllium Oxyhalides
      Beryllium Oxide
      Beryllium Hydroxide
      Beryllium Beryllate
      Beryllium Peroxide
      Beryllium Sulphide
      Beryllium Sulphide
      Beryllium Double Sulphates
      Beryllium Sulphite
      Beryllium Thiosulphate
      Beryllium Selenate
      Beryllium Chromate
      Beryllium Hydride
      Beryllium Chromite
      Beryllium Molybdate
      Beryllium Nitride
      Beryllium Azide
      Beryllium Nitrate
      Beryllium Phosphates, Phosphite, and Hypophosphite
      Beryllium Hypophosphate
      Beryllium Arsenates
      Beryllium Arsenite
      Beryllium Antimonate
      Beryllium Hydride
      Beryllium Vanadates
      Beryllium Niobate
      Beryllium Carbide
      Beryllium Borocarbide
      Beryllium Carbonate
      Beryllium Acetate
      Beryllium Oxalates
      Beryllium Cyanide
      Beryllium Platinocyanide
      Beryllium Silicates
      Beryllium Silicotungstate
      Beryllium Borate
      Beryllium Aluminate

Beryllium Bromide, BeBr2






Beryllium bromide, BeBr2, closely resembles the chloride. It forms white crystals which melt at about 490° C., and begins to volatilise below its melting-point. By distillation in a current of carbon dioxide it is obtained quite pure. Its vapour density agrees with the formula BeBr2. Water attacks it violently with evolution of hydrogen bromide.

It is easily obtained in solution by dissolving beryllium oxide or hydroxide in hydrobromic acid. Anhydrous beryllium bromide has been prepared by the action of bromine or hydrogen bromide on the metal, by the action of bromine on beryllium carbide, and by passing bromine over a heated mixture of beryllium oxide and carbon.


© Copyright 2008-2012 by atomistry.com